Book Review: Born to Be Wilde by Eloisa James

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For the past three months, I have thought about this book every single day.

I am not exaggerating.

Eloisa James is arguably my favorite author and I’ve thoroughly enjoyed both of her Wilde books so far. Yet, throughout the two books, I salivated at every scene that featured Lavinia and Parth—their bickering made the series for me. Needless to say I was very, very, very excited for this book.

So last night, at nine pm (I live on the West Coast), when the book popped up on my Kindle homepage I screamed. I sounded like a sixth-grade girl at the release of a Justin Bieber album. I promptly ignored the entire world (including my ten friends at my house for Bachelorette night) and started reading.

This book thoroughly met my expectations. I’ve already read it twice. It gave me all of the warm and fuzzy feelings and at least five daydreams. Watching Lavinia and Parth dance around their feelings touched my little heart.

This book was much darker than I excepted. Lavinia is dealing with her mom who, in the depths of an opioid addiction, squandered Lavinia’s dowry and stole from their friends. At the beginning of the book, Lavinia asks Parth to marry her out of desperation. Of course, she also asks due to her lingering infatuation—all of those insults she flung around for the past two books were really just a product of her inability to express her feelings. A very relatable issue to be honest.

Parth doesn’t know what to do with Lavinia after discovering her circumstances. He promises to help find her an adequate spouse but the more time he spends around Lavinia he begins to recognize her intelligence, her acute business acumen, and gains respect for her passion for fashion. She is not at the shallow vain girl that he once pegged her as.

This book is a gradual burn: lust is not conflated with love and there are very few sexy time scenes. In some ways, the book is less about Parth and Lavinia’s romance and more about Lavinia’s journey to find her confidence and self-worth. Born to be Wilde did not wallow in angst, but it is not a cheery read either. If you come into this book excepting 300 pages of silly flirtation and hurling insults (essentially Parth and Lavinia’s relationship in the previous two books), you will be disappointed. The reality of Lavinia’s situation is grim, and Eloisa James does not sugarcoat. However, the serious tone of the book fits the plot and definitely brings new depth to the characters we first met in Wilde in Love. And, as someone who loves cutesy romances, I actually believe the book is all the stronger for its serious tone.

I truly believe this is one of Eloisa James’ best books. While her writing is always superb, I don’t always like James’ characters. I loved Parth: his dedication to the Wildes, his confidence, and his sardonic humor. However, this is Lavinia’s book. Her quiet strength, ambition, and grab-the-bull-by-its-horns approach to life made her one of my favorite romance heroines of all time.

While this book can definitely be read as a standalone, I would highly recommend reading the previous two books in the series so you can gain a sense of Parth and Lavinia’s relationship before this book.

This book simply amazing. It has earned a spot on my all times favs shelf.

Rating: 5/5

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